Academic Advising, Standards & Evaluations

Grades and Grading Policies FAQs

This page discusses how to calculate your G.P.A., the values assigned to all grades, G.P.A. graduation requirements, grading policies (for example, retaking courses to make up for poor or penalty grades), opportunities available to students with a high G.P.A., support services available to students with a low G.P.A., pass/fail courses, and auditing courses.

How can I calculate my G.P.A.?

Calculating your G.P.A. doesn't require any fancy mathematical tricks-there's no algebra, geometry, trigonometry, or calculus. However, you do need to be very detailed with your addition, multiplication, and division--in other words, no rounding off your decimals!

Let's try an example. Click here to see the Lehman College transcript of a sample Lehman student, whom we'll call "Eyem A. Success".

Click here for an example of a G.P.A. worksheet or follow the step-by-step directions below.

  • Step 1: Group all of your Lehman classes according to the grades you received. (Grades you earned from other schools are NOT included in your Lehman G.P.A. unless you took the course on e-permit at another CUNY school.)
  • Step 2: Figure out the total number of credits earned. Add up the number of credits attached to each grade—these are your indexable credits. Line them up in a column.
  • Your results should look like this! Note the indexable credits lined up on the far right of the gray table.
  • Step 3: Calculate the number of "quality points" you have earned.
    Each grade has a "quality point value": for example, A is 4.0, A- is 3.7, B+ is 3.3, B is 3.0.
  • Your next step is to multiply the number of indexable credits by the quality point value for each grade. For example, six credits of "A" (two 3-credit classes in which you received As) would be worth 24 quality points.
  • Step 4: Add all the quality points.
  • Step 5: Add all the indexable credits.
  • Step 6: Divide the quality point total by the indexable credit total; calculate your answer to two decimal places. This is your G.P.A.

What do Lehman grades mean?

What does a grade of "R" mean? What about "W/WN/WU"? Or "FIN" or "Z"? etc. If you're not sure what your grades mean, take a look at a listing of grading symbols used at Lehman.

Which grades will be included in my G.P.A.?

All the indexable grades you have earned at the College, including A-F, Fs, FINs, WFs, WNs, (earned before Fall 2009) and WUs (except for those courses whose penalty has been removed under the Lehman "F" policy) are included in your G.P.A.

In addition, grades earned in courses taken on e-permit at other CUNY schools and some grades earned in courses taken through Lehman or City University study-abroad programs will be included in your G.P.A.

Which grades will not be included in my G.P.A.?

The P (Pass), NC (No Credit), INC (Incomplete), R (Repeat), W (Official Withdrawal), WN (never attended--earned during or after Fall 2009) and AUD (audit) grades are not included in your G.P.A. Additionally, some courses may be removed from the calculation of your G.P.A. under the CUNY F Policy or for other reasons (for example, you repeated a class you took earlier--or the class is is too similar to a class you took earlier for you to earn credit for both classes).

Grades earned at any previous institution or program (with the possible exception of courses taken through Lehman or City University study-abroad programs and the definite exception of courses taken on e-permit at other CUNY institutions) are not listed in your Lehman G.P.A. even if the College has accepted credits from those schools toward your Lehman degree.

Are my grades from my former college included in my Lehman G.P.A.?

No. While your credits have transferred, your grades have not. Courses taken at other CUNY school on e-permit WHILE you are attending Lehman College are included in your Lehman G.P.A. even though they are not counted toward your residency requirement and cannot be used to remove penalty grades from your Lehman G.P.A. under the CUNY F policy

Courses taken through Lehman or CUNY Study Abroad Programs may also be included in your Lehman G.P.A. For further information, see the Office of Undergraduate Studies and Study Abroad.

What G.P.A. do I need to graduate?

You must have a cumulative (overall) G.P.A. of at least 2.0 that includes all of your Lehman College courses as well as a G.P.A. of at least 2.0 in your Lehman major courses. You must also have a G.P.A. of at least 2.0 in your Lehman minor courses if you have declared a minor..

How can I calculate my G.P.A. in my major or minor?

Calculating the G.P.A. in the major or minor is exactly like calculating the overall G.P.A. except that one has to be careful to select only those courses that are included in one's program.

All courses in the major or minor department are included in the major or minor G.P.A. with the exception of introductory skills courses in the Departments of English, Mathematics and Computer Science, and Languages and Literatures. These classes include:

  • ESL 103 and 104
  • ENG 110, 111, 120, and 121
  • MAT 030, 080, 090, and 104
  • All foreign language courses numbered 101, 103, 105, and 107

If a student takes more than the minimum number of courses in the discipline, all are included; it is not possible to pick and choose among the courses. For example:

  • A student takes the 35-credit major in Psychology and maintains a solid B+/A- average in all courses in the major except for PSY 366, a four-credit course, in which he/she earns a "D." Even if the student takes two additional three-credit Psychology courses in senior year to "make up" for the poor grade in PSY 226, the two additional courses AND PSY 3666 will be included in the calculation of the major G.P.A.

In interdisciplinary programs, all courses in the various disciplines are included with the same exceptions listed above. For example,

  • In Computer Graphics and Imaging, all ART, CGI, CMP, and MAT (126 and higher) course grades are included in the calculation of the G.P.A.

In majors that include specific requirements in other departments, such as Biology, all courses in the major discipline are included and the specific courses in the other departments are included. Elective courses in the other departments are not included. For example:

  • For a Biology student, all BIO courses are included as well as MAT 175 and 176 or 231. If the student also took MAT 172, it would not be included in the calculation of the G.P.A.

For detailed information on how to calculate your G.P.A., click here.

For further information on your major or minor G.P.A., consult your Faculty Advisor.

My G.P.A. is looking very good.

Congratulations! As an accomplished Lehman student, you should be looking for opportunities to exercise your talents to their fullest. This may include joining a specialized program like the Lehman Scholars Program or pursuing an honors program within your major. Perhaps you would like to set up an independent project with a faculty mentor as a tutorial or set up an internship to get advanced experience in your field. Take full advantage of every opportunity Lehman has to offer you. Your time here lays a foundation for all you will accomplish in graduate or professional school and your eventual career. (Keep in mind that most graduate programs require a G.P.A. of at least 3.0 and that the program that interests you may have even more rigorous requirements. Sometime during your junior year, consult a Pre-Graduate Advisor for advice on preparing for graduate school.)

Lehman recognizes outstanding academic scholarship on the part of matriculated students.

  • Full time students will be placed on the Dean's List each fall and spring semester in which they have earned twelve or more credits with a G.P.A. of 3.5 or above. Part-time students will be placed on the Dean's List on each occasion in which they have completed twelve or more new credits in two consecutive semesters with a G.P.A. or above. In either case, no WU or INC grades are allowed even if twelve credits are completed with a 3.5 G.P.A.
  • Presidential Scholar is a designation bestowed upon students who have met all the qualifications for Dean's List and have exceeded the G.P.A. requirement for Dean's List by earning a 3.9 G.P.A. or higher. This honor supercedes placement on the Dean's List.

Some of the majors and interdisciplinary programs are associated with honor societies. These societies encourage students to take an active interest in independent and advanced study. Check with your Faculty Advisor for information on your program.

Other honor societies (for example, Phi Beta Kappa, Sigma Xi, and the Golden Key National Honor Society) are open to students from various disciplines; if you meet their qualifications, you will receive an invitation to join them.

At graduation, you may be eligible for departmental honors if you have an overall G.P.A. of 3.2 and a G.P.A. of 3.5 in your major or interdisciplinary program for a minimum of 24 credits. (Individual departments and programs may have additional requirements for their honors programs. Check with your Faculty Advisor for information on your program.)

In addition, college honors are awarded at graduation to those who have achieved the required G.P.A.s with a minimum of 60 credits earned at Lehman College:

  • Cum laude: 3.4-3.59
  • Magna cum laude: 3.6-3.79
  • Summa cum laude: 3.8-4.0

My G.P.A. is in trouble.

The phrase "My G.P.A. is in trouble" means different things to different students. If you want to keep the possibility of graduate school open even if you're not immediately planning on going, you should maintain a G.P.A. of at least a 3.0 (that is, a "B" average). The other threshold to keep in mind is your minimum retention index if you want to continue taking courses at Lehman College..

 

Total Attempted Credits Minimum Lehman College Cumulative Indices
0-12 (or first four courses) 1.5
13-24 (or first eight courses) 1.75
25 or more 2.0

 

If your G.P.A. falls below the minimum retention index, you will be placed on full-time probation automatically; if your G.P.A. remains below the minimum retention index for more than one semester by the end of the spring semester, you will be dropped from the College for poor scholarship and must file an appeal that, if granted, will allow you to resume your studies on either full- or part-time probation.

Students who find themselves in academic trouble should consult one of the Advisors in the Academic Information and Advisement Center in Shuster 280 to discuss their options. These options may include taking advantage of Lehman/CUNY grading policies, withdrawing from certain courses, or changing your plans for a major or minor.

There can be many reasons why students struggle with their classes. Your consultation may also include referrals to relevant student services. Following is a list of offices students often visit when they are unhappy with their academic performance.

ACADEMIC DIFFICULTIES

If you find yourself struggling with your coursework, there are many areas on campus that can support your efforts. These include:
  • Academic Support Center for Excellence (Old Gym Building 205, tel. 718-960-8175). Tutoring in the humanities and social sciences; test preparation (for example, CUNY Proficiency Examination); academic skills workshops.
  • Science Learning Center (Gillet Hall 133, tel. 718-960-7707). Tutoring in the sciences and college-level math; review workshops.
  • Math Lab (Gillet Hall 222, tel. 718-960-8878). Math tutoring for students taking the CUNY/ACT Basic Skills Test in Mathematics and basic math classes (MAT 175 and below).
  • English as a Second Language (Carman Hall, Room 339, tel. 718-960-8120). Testing and placement for students whose first language is not English and who need to improve their skills in English. Please contact the English Composition Office for further information.
  • Language Laboratory (Carman Hall, Room B37). Audiotapes and equipement for foreign language practice (French, Spanish, German, Russian, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese, Chinese, Hebrew, Swahili, Yoruba, and others). Cassette tapes are also available to assist students for whom English is a second language.
  • Library. Library tutors offer assistance in the use of electronic databases and other library resources. Please inquire at the Reference Desk (first floor).

TIME MANAGEMENT

The typical Lehman student juggles school, work, and family responsibilities on a daily basis-with a schedule like that, it's no wonder students can use help with finding the time to get it all done. Our Counseling Center offers workshops on time management and other topics of general interest to students.

HEALTH, PERSONAL OR FAMILY PROBLEMS

Getting healthy and staying healthy makes it easier to handle school and life responsibilities. The Student Health Center offers clinical services, women's health programs, wellness programs, and help with access to health insurance.

We all face times when real life gets a little "too real." The people who staff our Counseling Center are trained in helping students talk through difficult situations and feelings as they work through those issues that keep them from doing as well as they would like to. Professional and peer counseling are available on an individual and a group basis.

The Division of Student Affairs offers other support services for students, including a Child Care Center, International Student Services, Community Engagement and New Student Services, Urban Male Leadership Program, Veterans and Military Affairs, and Wellness Education and Promotion.

STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES

Students with documented disabilities can register with the Student Disability Services web page for access to a wide array of specialized services and equipment. Disabilities addressed by this office include, but are not limited to, learning disabilities, emotional disabilities, mobility impairments, visual impairments, and legal blindness. Available services include notetakers, tutors, proctors, readers and scribes, alternative testing conditions, extended/double time when taking exams, library assistance, registration assistance, access to a learning disability specialist, and an elevator key.

Available equipment includes Window Eyes, Zoom Text 7.0, JAWS 4.0, Dragon, text magnifiers,text reading machine, visual technologies, computer access, Internet access, and enlarged copies.

The Office of Special Student Services is located in Shuster Hall, Room 238, tel. 718-960-8441 and tel. 718-960-8931 (TTY). For further information, please visit the Student Disability Services web page.

Additional technological services are provided at the Assistive Technology Center in the Library, Room 215. Appointments can be made by calling 718-960-1167.

What is my Minimum Retention Index?

Your minimum retention index is the lowest G.P.A. you can earn and continue to take courses at Lehman College.

 

Total Attempted Credits Minimum Lehman College Cumulative Indices
0-12 (or first four courses) 1.5
13-24 (or first eight courses) 1.75
25 or more 2.0

 

If your G.P.A. falls below the minimum retention index, you will be placed on full-time probation automatically; if your G.P.A. remains below the minimum retention index for more than one semester by the end of the spring semester, you will be dismissed from the College for poor scholarship and must file an appeal that, if granted, will allow you to resume your studies on either full- or part-time probation.

Students who find themselves in academic trouble should consult one of the Advisors in the Academic Information and Advisement Center in Shuster 280 to discuss their options. These options may include taking advantage of Lehman/CUNY grading policies, withdrawing from certain courses, or changing your plans for a major or minor.

There can be many reasons why students struggle with their classes. Your consultation may also include referrals to relevant student services. Following is a list of offices students often visit when they are unhappy with their academic performance.

ACADEMIC DIFFICULTIES

If you find yourself struggling with your coursework, there are many areas on campus that can support your efforts. These include:
  • Academic Support Center for Excellence (Old Gym Building 205, tel. 718-960-8175). Tutoring in the humanities and social sciences; test preparation (for example, CUNY Proficiency Examination); academic skills workshops.
  • Science Learning Center (Gillet Hall 133, tel. 718-960-7707). Tutoring in the sciences and college-level math; review workshops.
  • Math Lab (Gillet Hall 222, tel. 718-960-8878). Math tutoring for students taking the CUNY/ACT Basic Skills Test in Mathematics and basic math classes (MAT 175 and below).
  • English as a Second Language (Carman Hall, Room 339, tel. 718-960-8120). Testing and placement for students whose first language is not English and who need to improve their skills in English. Please contact the English Composition Office for further information.
  • Language Laboratory (Carman Hall, Room B37). Audiotapes and equipement for foreign language practice (French, Spanish, German, Russian, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese, Chinese, Hebrew, Swahili, Yoruba, and others). Cassette tapes are also available to assist students for whom English is a second language.
  • Library. Library tutors offer assistance in the use of electronic databases and other library resources. Please inquire at the Reference Desk (first floor).

TIME MANAGEMENT

The typical Lehman student juggles school, work, and family responsibilities on a daily basis-with a schedule like that, it's no wonder students can use help with finding the time to get it all done. Our Counseling Center offers workshops on time management and other topics of general interest to students.

HEALTH, PERSONAL OR FAMILY PROBLEMS

Getting healthy and staying healthy makes it easier to handle school and life responsibilities. The Student Health Center offers clinical services, women's health programs, wellness programs, and help with access to health insurance.

We all face times when real life gets a little "too real." The people who staff our Counseling Center are trained in helping students talk through difficult situations and feelings as they work through those issues that keep them from doing as well as they would like to. Professional and peer counseling are available on an individual and a group basis.

The Division of Student Affairs offers other support services for students, including a Child Care Center, International Student Services, Community Engagement and New Student Services, Urban Male Leadership Program, Veterans and Military Affairs, and Wellness Education and Promotion.

STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES

Students with documented disabilities can register with the Student Disability Services web page for access to a wide array of specialized services and equipment. Disabilities addressed by this office include, but are not limited to, learning disabilities, emotional disabilities, mobility impairments, visual impairments, and legal blindness. Available services include notetakers, tutors, proctors, readers and scribes, alternative testing conditions, extended/double time when taking exams, library assistance, registration assistance, access to a learning disability specialist, and an elevator key.

Available equipment includes Window Eyes, Zoom Text 7.0, JAWS 4.0, Dragon, text magnifiers,text reading machine, visual technologies, computer access, Internet access, and enlarged copies.

The Office of Special Student Services is located in Shuster Hall, Room 238, tel. 718-960-8441 and tel. 718-960-8931 (TTY). For further information, please visit the Student Disability Services web page.

Additional technological services are provided at the Assistive Technology Center in the Library, Room 215. Appointments can be made by calling 718-960-1167.

 

Can my instructor lower my grade for being late or absent?

Your instructor has the right and the responsibility to set the standards and criteria by which you will be graded. These criteria can include attendance, punctuality, and class participation. It is your responsibility to find out which criteria your instructors will be using to determine your grades.

You are expected to attend your classes regularly. Instructors are required to record attendance for grading and counseling purposes as well as for determining financial aid eligibility.

Students who receive financial aid must be certified for attending classes regularly in order to keep certain financial aid awards and to continue receiving financial aid. All "W" grades--the "WU" for Unofficial Withdrawal, the "WN" for Never Attended, and the "W" for Withdrawal without [Academic] Penalty may have a negative impact on your eligibility got Financial Aid. Consult a Financial Aid Counselor in Shuster 136 for additional information.

I got an "F" in my course. How can I get it out of my G.P.A.?

Under the CUNY F policy, you can remove up to sixteen credits of penalty grades from the calculation of your G.P.A. by retaking the course and earning at least a C-. The F will stay on your transcript, but your G.P.A. will rise. This policy applies to F grades as well as other grades carrying the F penalty (i.e., WU grades for unofficial withdrawals and FIN grades for incomplete [INC] grades that were never completed). The WN (never attended) grade carried the F penalty prior to the Fall 2009 semester. As of Fall 2009, WN grades are not included in the calculation of the Lehman G.P.A.

This policy applies to courses with penalty grades that were first taken in Fall 1984 or later and successfully repeated as of Fall 1990 or later.

The CUNY F policy is particularly important if you're having difficulty with a course in your major or minor. Penalty grades have a more dramatic effect on the major and minor G.P.A. than on the overall G.P.A. because the penalty grades are being averaged into a smaller group of non-penalty grades. In some instances, penalty grades can prevent a student from graduating because a passing average (2.0 G.P.A.) in the major and the overall cumulative G.P.A. are graduation requirements. If you have declared a minor, then you need a passing average in the minor, as well, to graduate.

If you have earned more than sixteen credits in penalty grades, consult an Academic Advisor in Shuster 280 for advice on which courses to repeat under the CUNY F policy (or to discuss an appeal for shifting penalty grade relief from one course to another).

Once you have successfully retaken a course in which you have earned an F, WU, or FIN, your transcript will show that the mathematical value of the original grade has been removed from the total of indexable credits and is no longer part of your G.P.A.

I got a "D" in my course. Should I take the course again?

This is a hard question to answer without knowing the role that course plays in your graduation requirements. In most cases, students are neither required nor encouraged to repeat courses in which they have earned D and D+ grades because of the way these grades are treated. However, significant exceptions do exist.

Even if you earn a D/D+ grade, you receive the credits for the course. Repeating that course will not allow you to receive any additional credits for taking it again AND it will not take the original grade out of the calculation of your G.P.A. At best, you can hope for a higher grade that will be averaged into your G.P.A. as if it were just another course. Why not take another course in which you can earn a good grade and credits, too?

Another reason not to repeat a course in which you have earned a D or D+ is that you will be "stuck" with the second grade even if it is the same or lower than the first. Courses in which you have earned a D can be repeated only once. Even if you get a another D (or worse yet, an F!) the second time you take the course, you can't take the course a third time and have the results included in your G.P.A.

Despite all the arguments against repeating a D/D+ course, there are times when it makes sense to repeat such a course. Certain majors require students to earn certain minimum grades in specific courses as a condition of admission to that major--or as a condition of staying in that major. (For example, students who major in any of the Health Sciences Department's programs (for example, Dietettcs, Foods, and Nutrition; Health Services Administration; Exercise Science) cannot use courses in which a D or D+ grade has been earned as part of their major. Students must repeat these courses with a grade of C- or better to complete their majors.) In these instances, retaking the course is a logical decision.

When you have successfully retaken the course, the new grade is included in the calculation of your G.P.A., but the credits are not added to the total number of credits earned toward graduation. In other words, the course credits are included in your indexable credits, but not in your earned credits.

Warning for students who receive financial aid and/or scholarship monies: When you retake a course in which you have earned a D, you are not eligible to earn additional credits for that course. This means that you cannot use the course in the minimum number of credits you must take in order to qualify for full-time status. For example:

 

FALL 2002
ENG 110
MAT 132
SOC 166
THE 241
3 credits
4 credits
3 credits
3 credits
B
D
B+
A-
Spring 2003
ENG 120
MAT 132
BIO 183
HIS 272
3 credits
4 credits
4 credits
3 credits
A-
C+
B-
A

 

This student is not a full-time student in the Spring 2003 semester because he/she is taking only 10 credits– MAT 132 is not included in the credit count because no credits were earned in that course. If he/she receives financial aid or scholarship money as a full-time student for that semester, that money must be repaid before he/she can register for another semester.

If you are required to retake a course in which you have earned a D or D+ because the course cannot be included in your major because of department policy, you may be able to include the course in your total number of credits for Financial Aid purposes. Check with the Financial Aid Office in Shuster 136 and the Registrar's Office in Shuster 112 to verify the status of that course before completing your registration.

I got a C- (or better) and I want to repeat the course for a better grade. What can I do?

It is seldom in a student's best interest to repeat a course in which he or she has earned a grade of C- or better because the student will earn NO additional credits and the new grade will not be included in the student's Lehman G.P.A. However, there are some instances (for example, achieving a minimum grade required in a prerequisite course so that he or she can progress in the major or minor; trying to earn a better grade to qualify for a program outside of Lehman College) in which retaking such a course may make sense. Click here to download a form for permission to retake a course for no credit. Once you have filled out the form, take it to Shuster Hall, Room 280, for an Academic Advisor's signature (no appointment needed) and then take the form to the Registrar's Office in Shuster 112 for processing.

I got an "NC" grade. What does it mean?

The NC (NC) and R (Repeat) grades are non-penalty grades assigned to specific college courses in Grading System I. If you received either an NC or an R grade, the bad news is that you are required to repeat the course in order to receive credit for it. The good news is that even though you did not pass the course, your G.P.A. will remain unaffected by the grade.

  • The grading system for remedial and developmental courses (for example, MAT 090) consists of "A" through "C-," "R," "NC," and "WU."
  • The grading system for compensatory courses and foreign language courses numbered 101, 103, and 105 consists of "A" through "C-," "NC," and "WU."
  • The grading system for the College Requirement in English Composition (ENG 099, ENG 101, ENG 102, ENG 110, ENG 111, ENG 120, and ENG 121) consists of "A" through "C," "R," "NC," and "WU."

D and F grades cannot be assigned to these courses. Check here for a complete list of Lehman grading symbols and their significance.

Note: The "F" penalty attached to the WN grade stopped in the Fall 2009 semester.

I got an "R" grade. What does it mean?

The NC (NC) and R (Repeat) grades are non-penalty grades assigned to specific college courses in Grading System I. If you received either an NC or an R grade, the bad news is that you are required to repeat the course in order to receive credit for it. The good news is that even though you did not pass the course, your G.P.A. will remain unaffected by the grade.

  • The grading system for remedial and developmental courses (for example, MAT 090) consists of "A" through "C-," "R," "NC," and "WU."
  • The grading system for compensatory courses and foreign language courses numbered 101, 103, and 105 consists of "A" through "C-," "NC," and "WU."
  • The grading system for the College Requirement in English Composition (ENG 099, ENG 101, ENG 102, ENG 110, ENG 111, ENG 120, and ENG 121) consists of "A" through "C," "R," "NC," and "WU."

D and F grades cannot be assigned to these courses. Check the Undergraduate Bulletin for a complete list of Lehman grading symbols and their significance.

Note: The "F" penalty attached to the WN grade stopped in the Fall 2009 semester.

I can't finish my coursework in time. Can I get an extension?

If you know before the end of the semester that you will not be able to complete all of your work (for example, handing in a final paper or taking a final exam) and you know you are passing the course you may ASK your instructor for an extension in form of an INC (incomplete) grade. Whether or not your request for the INC grade is granted depends on whether the following conditions are met:

  1. Your instructor has a policy of granting requests for INC grades.
  2. You have met the attendance requirement and have a passing average in the course.
  3. Your instructor believes that the amount of work to be completed can reasonably be finished within the first ten weeks of the following semester.
  4. Your instructor believes that you have good and sufficient reason(s) for not completing your coursework by the end of the semester.

If your instructor grants your request, you and the instructor will then agree on a new deadline for the completion of the work–usually within the first ten weeks of the next semester. The standard deadline is printed in the Academic Calendar, but your instructor can set an earlier deadline if he or she chooses to do so.

PLEASE NOTE: If you wait more than ten weeks into the following semester to complete your missing work, neither the instructor nor the Department Chair is obligated to accept the completed work.

If your instructor does not submit a new grade before the deadline, the INC will automatically turn into a FIN at the end of the following semester and will be calculated as an F in your G.P.A. (For information on how to remove a FIN from the calculation of your G.P.A., click here.)

An INC is not included in either earned credits or indexable credits and so does not affect your G.P.A.; a FIN is included in indexable credits but not earned credits.

Many students ask for INC grades with the best of intentions but then find it difficult to complete the missing work when dealing with the workload of a new semester. Whenever possible, it is best to complete your work when it is first due.

INC grades are not a student "right"—instructors have the right to refuse any and all requests for INC grades.

I didn't finish my "INC" and it turned into a "FIN" ("F").

Because you did not complete the coursework within your required deadline (either ten weeks into the following semester or whatever deadline has been set by your instructor), the INC you received has automatically turned into a FIN and is calculated as an F in your G.P.A.

In some instances, you can negotiate a further extension with your instructor. However, permission to extend an INC beyond one semester is seldom granted--and even if it is granted, the FIN stays in your G.P.A. until the work is completed and a grade change form is submitted by the instructor.

In most instances, the only way to remove the FIN from the calculation of your G.P.A. is to retake the course and earn at least a C-. Under the CUNY F Policy, you can do this for up to sixteen credits worth of penalty grades (F, FIN, WU, and the WN, when the WN course was taken before Fall 2009).

I want to hand in the work I owe for my INC, but my instructor has left the College.

Whenever possible, try to contact your instructor directly to make arrangements to hand in your work. Sometimes instructors give out their personal contact information on their syllabi while others can be reached by asking the department secretary to forward a message.

If your instructor is unresponsive or unavailable, contact the Chair of the department for help in resolving the unfinished grade.

PLEASE NOTE: If you waited more than ten weeks into the following semester to complete your missing work, neither the instructor nor the department Chair is obligated to accept the completed work unless another deadline was negotiated before the instructor left the College.

I want to stop attending my class.

There is an official process for withdrawing from classes.

If you cannot continue to attend a class for any reason and it is before the deadline for withdrawal without academic penalty, you must drop the course in CUNYfirst before the deadline printed in the Academic Calendar.  If you encounter technical difficulties, see the Registrar's Office, Shuster Hall, Room 112.

No one is allowed to withdraw from English as a Second Language (ESL) and English Composition courses (ESL 085/086/095/096/103/104 and ENG 099/101/102/110/111/120/121) without a compelling reason (for example, a documentable severe illness or forced change in work schedule). For information and possible permission to withdraw, consult an advisor in the ESL Office or the English Composition Office in Carman 336 (718-960-8720).

Even though no academic penalty is involved, you should consult a Financial Aid Counselor in Shuster Hall, Room 136, if you are receiving financial aid or scholarship funding. Dropping below the minimum number of credits needed to maintain your status as a full-time or part-time student who is eligible for those funds may result in a loss of financial aid or scholarship funding. If this happens, you will owe Lehman College money and will not be allowed to register for any other courses until that debt is paid.

A W will appear on your transcript as your grade for the course if you withdraw before the deadline for withdrawal without academic penalty.

If you simply stop attending classes or if you file an appeal for a late or retroactive withdrawal and it is denied, a WU should appear on your transcript as your grade for the course. The WU is calculated as an F in your G.P.A. In most instances, the only way to remove the WU from the calculation of your G.P.A. is to retake the course and earn at least a C-. Under the CUNY F Policy, you can do this for up to sixteen credits worth of penalty grades (F, FIN, WU, and WN [The F penalty applies to the WU grade only when when earned before Fall 2009.]).

If you must withdraw after the deadline and you believe there is a good reason why you should not receive a WU (Unofficial Withdrawal) grade, you can file an appeal in the Academic Advising Office in Shuster Hall, Room 280. All appeals must include documents that prove the extenuating circumstances behind your late withdrawal.

All appeals for withdrawal without penalty after the deadline may be heard after the end of the semester.

I stopped going to my course(s) and I got a "WU."

If you stop attending class at any point in the semester without notifying your instructor(s) of the reason for your absence and how long you expect to be away AND you do not drop the course in CUNYfirst before the deadline printed in the Academic Calendar, you should expect to receive a WU grade. It signifies an Unofficial Withdrawal and is calculated in your G.P.A. as an F.

In cases like this, if you have been reasonably faithful in attendance and submitted most of the work due for the semester, your instructor(s) may assume that your absence from the class does not indicate a lack of interest in completing the work. In that instance he/she may give you an INC grade in the hope that you will return in the following semester to complete all missed assignments and tests. Such cases are rare—and can backfire if you were forced by circumstances beyond your control to stop attending classes and you later seek a retroactive withdrawal (appeal to turn WU grades into W grades that do not affect your G.P.A.).

If you received a WU grade because you were forced to stop attending classes due to unforeseen circumstances and and can provide documentation for the reason behind your unofficial withdrawal, consult an Academic Advisor about an appeal for a late or retroactive withdrawal.

In most instances, the only way to remove the WU from the calculation of your G.P.A. is to retake the course and earn at least a C-. Under the CUNY F Policy, you can do this for up to sixteen credits worth of penalty grades (F, FIN, WU).

All "W" grades--the "WU" for Unofficial Withdrawal, the "WN" for Never Attended, and the "W" for Withdrawal without [Academic] Penalty may have a negative impact on your eligibility got Financial Aid. Consult a Financial Aid Counselor for additional information.

What are indexable credits?

Indexable credits are credits for courses in which you can earn a letter grade; i.e., a grade that changes your G.P.A.. These grades include all grades A through F as well as FIN (INComplete grades turned into F), WU, and WN (Unofficial Withdrawal - never attended when course taken before Fall 2009) grades.

Non-indexable credits:
  • Although NC and R grades are letter grades that indicate you have not passed a course, they do not affect the calculation of your G.P.A. They are included in your attempted credits.
  • Courses you have taken on a pass/fail basis are included in your indexable credits only if you fail the course; P (Pass) grades are not included in the calculation of your G.P.A.
  • Audited courses (AUD) and courses from which you have officially withdrawn (W) are not counted in your indexable credits.
  • Courses in which you earned a WN grade as of Fall 2009 or later are not included in your G.P.A.
  • Courses in which you have earned an INC grade do not affect your G.P.A. until the INC changes into another grade.

Click here for a full list of Lehman College grading symbols.

What are attempted credits?

Attempted credits are credits for all the courses you ever registered for and kept past the Drop/Add deadlines. These include (but are not limited to) all :

  • courses in which you have earned both a grade and credits
  • courses from which you have withdrawn either officially or unofficially (W and WU plus the WN grade when the course was taken after Fall 2009)
  • courses in which you earned no credit but no penalty grade was assigned (NC and R)
  • courses in which you earned no credit and a penalty grade was assigned (F and FIN)
  • transferred credits
  • courses in which you have received an INC grade
  • courses for which you have registered but have not yet taken or completed

Click here for a full list of Lehman College grading symbols.

Can I take this course on a pass/fail basis?

You may take a course on a pass/fail basis if :

  • The course does not satisfy your major, minor, or general education requirements
  • The number of credits you would earn in this course would not cause you to exceed the eighteen-credit limit on the total number of pass/fail credits that can be applied to the Lehman degree
  • It is the only course you are taking on a pass/fail basis that semester (unless the course is offered only on a pass/fail basis)
  • The course is not a teacher education course (unless the course is offered only on a pass/fail basis)

Once the registration period is over, you may not change the grading status of any course. In other words, even when you are doing A-level work in a pass-fail course, you may not earn any grade other than P or F for the course unless you contact the Registrar's Office to change the grading status of the course before the end of the late registration period.

Can I retake a course? Should I retake a course?

It is impossible to determine whether you can or should retake a course without knowing what the grade is and how the course can be used to fulfill your graduation requirements.

  • F, WU, FIN, and WN (WN grades only when earned before Fall 2009): You must retake a required course you have failed. Under the CUNY F Policy, you can remove up to sixteen credits worth of penalty grades (F, FIN, WU) from the calculation of your G.P.A. by retaking the course and earning at least a C-.
  • Depending on the total number of courses you need to repeat in order to replace penalty grades, you may also want to repeat elective courses. If you are not sure whether repeating a course in in your best interest, consult an Academic Advisor or Faculty Advisor in your major or minor.
  • D and D+: Click here for more information.
  • A through C-: The answer is almost always no, although exceptions exist. If in doubt, consult an Academic Advisor or Faculty Advisor in your major or minor.

Can I audit a course?

Yes. All students may audit any course other than a laboratory course as long the course does not involve the use of consumable material and/or equipment.

You cannot earn any credits in an AUD-graded course; the AUD grade does not affect the calculation of your G.P.A.

As an auditor, you will be charged the same tuition rate as those students who are taking the course for credit.

Audited courses cannot be used to qualify for full-time or part-time status, financial aid, or veteran's benefits.

Once the registration period has ended, you will not be allowed to change from regular registration to auditing or from auditing to regular registration.

I am registered for one section of a course but am attending another. How can I get my grade?

You must file an appeal for late withdrawal from the section in which you are registered and for late registration in the section you are attending. Click here for more information.

There is no guarantee that such appeals will be granted.

Last modified: Oct 24, 2014

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