History Department

HIE 714

HIE714-XM81: Europe in the 20th Century

Lehman College –Fall 2010

Mondays 6:00-8:40pm Carman 201

Prof. Ackerman

Click here for a pdf version of the syllabus

Course information

Catalogue description: Three hours, three credits. (Not open to students who have taken HIE 314). World War I, the rise and fall of communism in Russia and Eastern Europe; Fascism; World War II; postwar prosperity; European union and the impact of immigration.

As the twentieth century opened, much of Europe, especially Western Europe, was sturdy, prosperous and confident. The catastrophe of the First World War put an end to many certainties. Three great European empires crumbled. New ideologies arose. Economies faltered, and a second catastrophic war was fought. The Holocaust endeavored to wipe out supposedly inferior peoples.

By mid-century, Europe underwent a series of self-examinations. A gentler world began to be created, at least in Western Europe, where strength began to be measured by the services the state could bring and the economic prosperity it could foster. Colonial empires began to crumble. Communism fell, leaving in its wake considerable economic suffering and renewed ethnic and nationalist rivalries. Europe grappled with a burgeoning immigrant population and struggles with questions of equity for its newcomers. This course will endeavor to address all these issues.

Instructor information

Evelyn Ackerman

tel: 718 960-7243

email: eackerman7@att.net

office: Carman 296

office hours: Monday 1:45-2:15; Monday 4-5:45; Wednesday 1:45-2:15. I am also generally available by appointment any time on Monday afternoon.

Course learning objectives

Students will:

Encounter primary sources

Contextualize historical events and describe change over time

Acquire and analyze historical source materials

Write clear and well-documented papers with a historiographical focus.

Materials

The main text is

Mark Mazower, Dark Continent: Europe’s 20th Century. Mazower will be available at the bookstore and on reserve at the library.

Three documents will be handed out in class:

1. Omar Bartov, “Fields of Glory,” from his Mirrors of Destruction. (Mirrors of Destruction is also available on the Internet through Lehman College’s ebrary.)

2. Fritz Kreisler, “Four Weeks in the Trenches: The War Story of a Violinist”

3. Henry Sheahan (Henry Beston), “A Volunteer Poilu”

(Kreisler and Sheahan are also available on the Internet at http://www.lib.byu.edu/~rdh/wwi/memoir.html

(If you cannot access Kreisler and Sheehan with this URL, google World War I memoirs and you will see the URL listed on the first page).

Students are also required to read

Marion Kaplan, Between Dignity and Despair, chapters 1, 2, and 4.

Lucie Aubrac, Outwitting the Gestapo

G. Perec, Things: A Story of the Sixties

Francoise Gaspard, A Small City in France

The above four titles will be available at the bookstore and on reserve at the library.

Grading policy

Intelligent class participation 30%

5-page paper analyzing perceptions of suffering in World War I due Sept 27 20%

5-page paper analyzing reactions to World War II due Oct 25 25%

5-page paper analyzing Europe’s struggle to adapt to new immigrants due Dec 13 25%

A hard copy of each paper is due at the beginning of class on date indicated above. Late papers will be penalized one full grade for each class day late. No email submissions of papers, please.

No extra credit assignments are permitted.

The Fine Print

Please do NOT do the reading in class. STUDENTS WHO READ IN CLASS WILL HAVE THEIR GRADES LOWERED. (Exceptions will be made when we analyze documents such as Kreisler and Sheahan together). More than three absences or repeated latenesses will also lower your grade. Please turn off beepers and cell phones before entering class. Please do not text. Please avoid elaborate eating. Despite all these rules, most people actually enjoy this class!

Plagiarism

All work in this class must be your own. Any plagiarism on papers – the use of someone else’s words or ideas without acknowledging them as such – will result in a failing grade on the paper. You must cite your sources, using Chicago style. Any material used verbatim must be acknowledge in a footnote AND put in quotation marks.

 


Fall 2010 Professor Ackerman

Course schedule

Aug 30 Introduction: Europe at Zenith

 

Sept 6 NO CLASS

 

Sept 13 World War I: Suffering, Memory, and Legacy

Handouts: Kreisler, Sheahan (Beston), Bartov

 

Sept 20 Beginnings: The Early Russian Revolution and the Stirrings of Fascism

Mazower (=M), chs. 1, 2.

 

Sept 27 Healthy Bodies, Sick Bodies

M, ch. 3.

5-page paper due on the suffering and legacies of World War I

 

Oct 4 The Crisis of Capitalism: 1920s and 1930s

M, ch. 4.

 

Oct 11 NO CLASS

 

Oct 18 Hitler’s New Order

M, ch. 5; Kaplan, Between Dignity and Despair, chs. 1, 2, 4; Aubrac,

Outwitting the Gestapo

 

Oct 25 Blueprints for the New Age

M, ch. 6.

5-page paper due on Nazism and resistance

Nov 1 A Brutal Peace, 1943-1949

M, ch. 7.

film East-West

 

Nov 8 Building People’s Democracy

M, ch. 8.

 

Nov 15 Democracy Transformed: Western Europe, 1950-1975

M, ch.9; Perec, Things

 

Nov 22 The Social Contract in Crisis

M. ch. 10.

 

Nov 29 The Collapse of Communism

M, ch. 11.

 

Dec 6 Immigration

Gaspard, A Small City in France

Dec 13 The Future of Europe

M, Epilogue: Making Europe

HiE714-XM81: Europe in the 20th Century

Mondays 6:00-8:40pm Carman 201

Prof. Ackerman

Click here for a pdf version of the syllabus

Course information

Catalogue description: Three hours, three credits. (Not open to students who have taken HIE 314). World War I, the rise and fall of communism in Russia and Eastern Europe; Fascism; World War II; postwar prosperity; European union and the impact of immigration.

As the twentieth century opened, much of Europe, especially Western Europe, was sturdy, prosperous and confident. The catastrophe of the First World War put an end to many certainties. Three great European empires crumbled. New ideologies arose. Economies faltered, and a second catastrophic war was fought. The Holocaust endeavored to wipe out supposedly inferior peoples.

By mid-century, Europe underwent a series of self-examinations. A gentler world began to be created, at least in Western Europe, where strength began to be measured by the services the state could bring and the economic prosperity it could foster. Colonial empires began to crumble. Communism fell, leaving in its wake considerable economic suffering and renewed ethnic and nationalist rivalries. Europe grappled with a burgeoning immigrant population and struggles with questions of equity for its newcomers. This course will endeavor to address all these issues.

Instructor information

Evelyn Ackerman

tel: 718 960-7243

email: eackerman7@att.net

office: Carman 296

office hours: Monday 1:45-2:15; Monday 4-5:45; Wednesday 1:45-2:15. I am also generally available by appointment any time on Monday afternoon.

Course learning objectives

Students will:

Encounter primary sources

Contextualize historical events and describe change over time

Acquire and analyze historical source materials

Write clear and well-documented papers with a historiographical focus.

Materials

The main text is

Mark Mazower, Dark Continent: Europe’s 20th Century. Mazower will be available at the bookstore and on reserve at the library.

Three documents will be handed out in class:

1. Omar Bartov, “Fields of Glory,” from his Mirrors of Destruction. (Mirrors of Destruction is also available on the Internet through Lehman College’s ebrary.)

2. Fritz Kreisler, “Four Weeks in the Trenches: The War Story of a Violinist”

3. Henry Sheahan (Henry Beston), “A Volunteer Poilu”

(Kreisler and Sheahan are also available on the Internet at http://www.lib.byu.edu/~rdh/wwi/memoir.html

(If you cannot access Kreisler and Sheehan with this URL, google World War I memoirs and you will see the URL listed on the first page).

Students are also required to read

Marion Kaplan, Between Dignity and Despair, chapters 1, 2, and 4.

Lucie Aubrac, Outwitting the Gestapo

G. Perec, Things: A Story of the Sixties

Francoise Gaspard, A Small City in France

The above four titles will be available at the bookstore and on reserve at the library.

Grading policy

Intelligent class participation 30%

5-page paper analyzing perceptions of suffering in World War I due Sept 27 20%

5-page paper analyzing reactions to World War II due Oct 25 25%

5-page paper analyzing Europe’s struggle to adapt to new immigrants due Dec 13 25%

A hard copy of each paper is due at the beginning of class on date indicated above. Late papers will be penalized one full grade for each class day late. No email submissions of papers, please.

No extra credit assignments are permitted.

The Fine Print

Please do NOT do the reading in class. STUDENTS WHO READ IN CLASS WILL HAVE THEIR GRADES LOWERED. (Exceptions will be made when we analyze documents such as Kreisler and Sheahan together). More than three absences or repeated latenesses will also lower your grade. Please turn off beepers and cell phones before entering class. Please do not text. Please avoid elaborate eating. Despite all these rules, most people actually enjoy this class!

Plagiarism

All work in this class must be your own. Any plagiarism on papers – the use of someone else’s words or ideas without acknowledging them as such – will result in a failing grade on the paper. You must cite your sources, using Chicago style. Any material used verbatim must be acknowledge in a footnote AND put in quotation marks.

 

Course schedule

Aug 30 Introduction: Europe at Zenith

Sept 6 NO CLASS

Sept 13 World War I: Suffering, Memory, and Legacy
Handouts: Kreisler, Sheahan (Beston), Bartov

Sept 20 Beginnings: The Early Russian Revolution and the Stirrings of Fascism
Mazower (=M), chs. 1, 2.

Sept 27 Healthy Bodies, Sick Bodies
M, ch. 3.

5-page paper due on the suffering and legacies of World War I

Oct 4 The Crisis of Capitalism: 1920s and 1930s
M, ch. 4.

Oct 11 NO CLASS

Oct 18 Hitler’s New Order
M, ch. 5; Kaplan, Between Dignity and Despair, chs. 1, 2, 4; Aubrac, Outwitting the Gestapo

Oct 25 Blueprints for the New Age
M, ch. 6.

5-page paper due on Nazism and resistance

Nov 1 A Brutal Peace, 1943-1949
M, ch. 7.
film East-West

Nov 8 Building People’s Democracy
M, ch. 8.

Nov 15 Democracy Transformed: Western Europe, 1950-1975
M, ch.9; Perec, Things

Nov 22 The Social Contract in Crisis
M. ch. 10.

Nov 29 The Collapse of Communism
M, ch. 11.

Dec 6 Immigration
Gaspard, A Small City in France

Dec 13 The Future of Europe
M, Epilogue: Making Europe

 

Last modified: Oct 25, 2011

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