Department of Chemistry

Arthur Sweeny Jr. Scholarships and Lecture

 

Arthur Sweeny, Jr. Scholarships

Arthur Sweeny Jr. Scholarships are awarded to outstanding students who are working toward a degree in chemistry.  Students are chosen by a committee of chemistry faculty, and are typically awarded to the student in their third year of chemistry.

The Arthur Sweeny, Jr. Lecture

The Arthur Sweeny, Jr. Lecture is given annually, usually in the late fall, by an outstanding scientist or person in a science-related field.  The occasion of the lecture is an opportunity to pay tribute to the memory of Prof. Sweeny - who was an outstanding teacher, friend and colleague who gave so much, so willingly, to his students and to science. The lecture is also a forum for exposure to and discussion of current topics in chemistry and related fields. At the reception before and the dinner after the lecture, there are opportunities to meet and greet our undergraduate majors and alumni and friends of the department, many of whom return each year to celebrate this event and ensure that we will not ever forget this man who deserves our honor and recognition.

Profile of Professor Arthur Sweeny, Jr.

Prof. Arthur SweenyArthur Sweeny retired in 1974 after 44 years of teaching and research. Professor Sweeny established the first pre-medical office at the College. He was also the first Grand Marshal for the Academic Procession. Upon meeting Arthur Sweeny, one recognized a gentleman in every sense. He is a man who loved and respected teaching, his profession, and above all, his students. Professor Sweeny died in 2001 at the age of 94.

For almost twenty-five years Arthur Sweeny directed the Undergraduate Cancer Research Program at the College. Affiliations developed with the Sloan-Kettering Research Institute, as well as with the New York University College of Medicine. These two institutions served as the testing laboratories for the potential anti-tumor agents developed and synthesized in Professor Sweeny's laboratory. Numerous publications resulted from the research project. Financial support for this program came from sources within as well as outside the University. The highlight of the Program, however, may well have been the undergraduate chemistry majors who participated. These students are legion, and today include teachers, physicians and chemists at all degree levels. These people, to this day, remember Professor Sweeny with fondness and respect, and remain loyal to the Department and the College.

Last modified: Apr 9, 2014

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