Produced by the Department of Media Relations & Publications
 

Cornbury, the Queen's Governor: A Comedy in Two Acts

April 27, 2009

In this segment, playwright and theatre professor William Hoffman talks about the upcoming Lehman College production of his play, "Cornbury, the Queen's Governor."

3 Minutes 10 Seconds

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Transcript

00:00

[MUSIC]

SARAH SUMLER:

This is Sarah Sumler, a student at Lehman College. In this segment, playwright and theatre professor William Hoffman talks about the upcoming Lehman College production of his play, "Cornbury, the Queen's Governor."

The play follows the story of Edward Hyde, known as Lord Cornbury, who was Governor General of New York during the 1700's. Cornbury was a notorious character known for his habit of dressing up like his first cousin, Queen Anne. The play enjoyed a successful run earlier this year at Theatre Askew in Manhattan, but now Professor Hoffman is bringing his funny, historical romp to the stage at Lehman College.

Cornbury opens on April 29th and will run until May 3rd, 2009 at the Studio Theatre.

00:50

WILLIAM HOFFMAN:

Cornbury is-- which I wrote with a collaborator, Anthony Holland-- is a play about Lord Cornbury: Edward Hyde, Lord Cornbury, who was the Governor General of New York under the English, and it's an account of his last year in power. He was a flamboyant, wild man, and rumor has it that he-- to emphasize his relationship with Queen Anne (he was her first cousin)-- he would dress like her.

Tony and I wrote the play many, many years ago. The year was 1974. And preparations were hot and heavy for the American bicentennial, the American Bicentennial of the American Revolution, and we noticed, Tony and I, that there were no plans to celebrate any gay presence in America. So we were furious about it, and so we, as an act of fun and revenge, we wrote our story of a "great American."

I loved what the other director did-- Tim Cusack, for Theater Askew, did a wonderful job. But it isn't exactly the way I would do it. This way, I could get to do it my way.

02:08

I very rarely write something that is purely comedy, or purely serious. I like to use comedy to make a point and express some very deep feelings, sometimes. So I think people-- if you come there to laugh, you're in the right mood.

I think Lehman students of theater, are amazingly talented, and they bring an openness to their work that I enjoy. I just hope everyone comes and enjoys themselves. I'll see you at the show.

02:38

SARAH SUMLER:

Visit us at www.lehman.edu. This is a production of the Lehman College Media Relations Office.

[MUSIC]

02:55

[END OF AUDIO]