Produced by the Department of Media Relations & Publications
 

New Faculty Appointments 2010-2011

November 15, 2010

From the Provost and Senior Vice President For Academic Affairs

Mary A. Papazian
Dr. Mary A. Papazian

I am very pleased to welcome to Lehman College a new twenty-seven person strong cohort of instructors, professional supporters of our academic programs, tenured, and tenure-track faculty members to our campus community. Our new colleagues bring with them a diverse set of academic backgrounds and experiences, and as a group I am confident that they will strengthen our programs and the college for years to come. My appreciation goes out to our current faculty and staff for their success in attracting such a strong group to Lehman during these difficult economic times. As we enter our eightieth year as an institution of higher education, we remain firmly committed to "Achieving the Vision," in the words of our new strategic plan. The arrival of our new colleagues affirms our commitment to our continued progress as an institution of higher learning that is dedicated to fulfilling its mission in all its dimensions, despite the current budgetary challenges.

I hope that when you read the biographies of these outstanding educators and scholars contained in these pages, you will be impressed and energized. They have studied at a variety of distinguished institutions near and far, such as Princeton University, New York University, Columbia University, Stanford University, UCLA, Justus-Liebig-University in Germany, University College of Wales, Utrecht University, McGill University, and many others throughout the United States—in the North, South, East, and West, as well as in the American heartland. As you will learn, some of our new colleagues have achieved distinction through long careers in their fields. Others are just beginning.


Convocation, September 15, 2010: (left to right) Dr. Mary Papazian, provost and senior vice president for Academic Affairs; Adjunct Teacher of the Year Janet Gonzalez (Chemistry); Teacher of the Year Marta Ghezzo (Music); Bharat Sharma, Central Stores; Gezina Bouma, Campus Planning and Facilities; Maritza Rivera, Office of the President; and Dr. Julius P. Williams, keynote speaker.

This new group of talented faculty members fills me with pride and anticipation as its members join our current outstanding faculty in Lehman's educational enterprise. They represent such fields as African and African-American studies, Latin American and Puerto Rican studies, English, music and film, anthropology, economics, educational leadership, mathematics education, biological sciences, chemistry, geography and environmental studies, health sciences, languages and literature, nursing, political science, sociology, and social work. I am confident that they will strengthen our academic programs and enrich the intellectual life of our academic community.

I have always believed that education forms the core of our democracy and that it is essential for ensuring a life of fulfillment and contribution for us as individuals and as a society. As members of the faculty, we are entrusted with preparing future generations for a fulfilling life in a challenging and constantly expanding world. I am firmly convinced that the excellence that defines Lehman College will be strongly enhanced by our new colleagues. We look forward to enjoying your presence and working with you in our common endeavor. Welcome!

Dr. Mary A. Papazian
Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs

DIVISION OF ARTS AND HUMANITIES

Jennifer Onyedum

Jennifer Onyedum
Assistant Professor, African and African American Studies
B.A., Brown University; Ph.D., Princeton University

Dr. Jennifer Johnson Onyedum received her Ph.D. in History from Princeton University in 2010. Her dissertation examined the politics of medicine and international intervention during the Algerian struggle for national liberation, 1954-1962. Dr. Onyedum specializes in contemporary African history, with a particular interest in North Africa, decolonization, and humanitarianism. She has received several fellowships, including an Andrew W. Mellon fellowship in Humanistic Studies, and awards from the Social Science Research Council, the American Institute for Maghrib Studies, and the National History Center. She teaches courses on pre-colonial to present-day African history and the history of medicine.

Deirdre O'Boy

Deirdre O'Boy
Lecturer, English
B.A., Pace University; M.A., Fordham University

Deirdre O'Boy received her B.A. in English from Pace University and her master's degree from Fordham University. She has been teaching at Lehman in the English Department since September 2001, focusing on courses in freshman composition, literature, general education, and humanities. She is a frequent participant in the Lincoln Center Institute's Aesthetic Education program for prospective teachers studying at Lehman College, has participated in Writing Across the Curriculum and in numerous technology initiatives at Lehman, and is a member of the Faculty Council for the CUNY Institute for Irish American Studies.

Lee Quinby

Lee Quinby
Distinguished Lecturer, English
B.A., University of North Florida; M.A., Ph.D., Purdue University

Dr. Lee Quinby is the inaugural visiting professor at Macaulay Honors College at the City University of New York. She received her Ph.D. in American Studies and English from Purdue University and has held endowed chair positions at Brooklyn College, Hobart and William Smith Colleges, and the Rochester Institute of Technology. Dr. Quinby specializes in the study of apocalyptic and millennial belief in American society and has written three books: Millennial Seduction, Anti-Apocalypse, and Freedom, Foucault, and the Subject of America. Her journal articles have been published in the American Historical Review, Constellations, ESQ, and SIGN, and she is currently working on a series of essays on apocalypse and film.

Michael Bacon

Michael Bacon
Distinguished Lecturer, Journalism, Communication, and Theatre
B.A., Lehman College

Michael Bacon is a musician, singer-songwriter, and a prolific scorer for film and television. This year, he will be teaching Scoring for Film, a new communications course. He has scored twelve feature films, including the 2009 documentary Boy Interrupted and Loverboy (2005), directed by his brother Kevin. His work in television earned an Emmy Award for the American Experience documentary "The Kennedys" and the Television Music Award for "LBJ." Over the past decade, he has recorded five albums and toured with his brother as part of the group The Bacon Brothers. An alumnus of Lehman College, he studied composition and orchestration with Distinguished Professor John Corigliano. He returns to Lehman to share his wealth of professional experience.

Alexandra Coller

Alexandra Coller
Assistant Professor, Languages and Literatures
B.A., Hunter College, CUNY; M.A., Ph.D., New York University

Dr. Alexandra Coller received her B.A. in Romance Languages, French, and Italian from Hunter College and her doctoral degree from New York University. While at NYU, she taught courses on Dante, Shakespeare, Machiavelli, and Montaigne for the Department of Italian Studies and for the Medieval and Renaissance Center. Prior to joining Lehman, Dr. Coller held visiting posts at SUNY at Stony Brook in the Department of Comparative and Literary Studies, at Dickinson College in the Department of French and Italian, and at Fairfield University in the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures. Her publications on women, gender, comic drama, and early opera have appeared in The Italianist, Italian Studies, and Italian Quarterly. She is presently at work on her book manuscript, Women in Italian Renaissance and Baroque Drama.

Andrés Torres

Andrés Torres
Distinguished Lecturer, Latin American and Puerto Rican Studies
B.B.A., Manhattan College; M.A., New York University; Ph.D., The New School

Dr. Andrés Torres has taught in the fields of Puerto Rican/Latino Studies and Economics and has written extensively on economic and socio-political trends among Latino populations in the United States. His publications include Between Melting Pot and Mosaic: African Americans and Puerto Ricans in the New York Political Economy (1995) and, most recently, Signing in Puerto Rican: A Hearing Son and His Deaf Parents, a family memoir based on his experience growing up in New York City among deaf parents, aunts, and uncles. Dr. Torres has served as a research associate at the Center for Puerto Rican Studies at Hunter College and in 2008-2009 was the interim director for the Latino Faculty Initiative of the City University of New York. Previously, he was a professor at the University of Massachusetts, Boston, where he also directed the Mauricio Gastón Institute for Latino Community Development and Public Policy.

DIVISION OF EDUCATION

Rosa Rivera-McCutchen

Rosa Rivera-McCutchen
Assistant Professor, Counseling, Leadership, Literacy, and Special Education
B.A., M.S., University of Rochester; Ph.D., New York University

Dr. Rosa L. Rivera-McCutchen joins the Department of Counseling, Leadership, Literacy, and Special Education as an assistant professor in the Educational Leadership program. She received her bachelor's and master's degrees from the University of Rochester and her Ph.D. in Teaching and Learning from New York University. Her dissertation, "Is Small All? A Study of the Intersecting Factors Contributing to the Successes and Challenges of a Small Bronx High School," was based on an ethnographic case study of a school that emerged from the small-school reform efforts of the 1990s. Prior to her doctoral studies, she taught humanities and history for several years in a Bronx high school and subsequently was the operations director of DonorsChoose.org, a not-for-profit educational organization. She also has worked as an educational research consultant and conducted numerous program evaluations. Most recently, she was an adjunct instructor at Baruch College, CUNY, where she taught a series of graduate courses in the scaffolded apprenticeship model, part of an educational leadership and comprehensive school improvement program there.

Orlando Alonso

Orlando Alonso
Assistant Professor, Middle and High School Education
B.S., Higher Institute of Pedagogy Felix Varela; M.A., The City College of New York; Ed.D., Columbia University

Dr. Orlando B. Alonso was born in Santa Clara, Cuba, where he received his bachelor's degree in mathematics education. He worked for three years as a mathematics teacher in a vocational school for gifted students and for twelve years at The Felix Varela Higher Pedagogical Institute, where he was promoted to the rank of associate professor. During this period, he focused on the study of definition and boundary value problems for analytic functions. He emigrated to the United States in 1996 and received his master's degree in mathematics education at The City College of New York in 2000. He taught mathematics at Louis Brandeis High School for four years and was a lecturer and an instructor at Hunter College, Bronx Community College, and LaGuardia Community College for seven years. He received a doctorate in Mathematics Education (Ed.D.C.T.) at The Teachers College of Columbia University in 2009 under the sponsorship of Joseph Malkevitch and completed the second level toward a Ph.D. in mathematics at The CUNY Graduate Center. He also was a visiting assistant professor in the Division of Education at Mount Saint Mary College for one year.

Joi Jones

Joi Jones
College Lab Technician, Middle and High School Education
B.S., University of Alabama; M.P.A., University of Alabama at Birmingham

Joi Jones attended the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa. Once she completed her degree in marketing, she moved to Birmingham, where she worked in the insurance industry for several years. Shifting gears into the public sector work, she earned a master's degree in public administration from the University of Alabama at Birmingham. She was enriched by her direct service work, supervisory, and volunteer management experience with welfare recipients at the Family Guidance Center and with children afflicted with life-threatening medical conditions at the Make a Wish Foundation.

DIVISION OF NATURAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCES

Cameron McNeil

Cameron McNeil
Assistant Professor, Anthropology
B.A., Occidental College; M.A., University of Connecticut; Ph.D., The Graduate Center, CUNY

Dr. Cameron L. McNeil is an associated researcher of the New York Botanical Garden and joins Lehman College as an assistant professor. Dr. McNeil is an archaeologist whose research focuses on ritual plant use and landscape transformation processes of the ancient Maya. She has worked at the pre-Columbian Maya city of Copan in Honduras since 1999 and is currently conducting paleoecological research at the site of Tayasal in Guatemala. Dr. McNeil edited the book Chocolate in Mesoamerica: A Cultural History of Cacao and co-edited a second, The Ch'orti' Maya Area: Past and Present. Chocolate in Mesoamerica was awarded the Society for Economic Botany's 2008 Mary W. Klinger Award for Outstanding New Book. Recent work by Dr. McNeil has called into question the hypothesis that deforestation was a major contributing factor to the ninth-century collapse of Copan.

Ayanna Alexander-Street

Ayanna Alexander-Street
Lecturer, Biological Sciences
B.S., University of Connecticut; Ph.D., The Graduate Center, CUNY

Dr. Ayanna Alexander-Street received her B.S. from the University of Connecticut and her Ph.D. from the CUNY Graduate Center in neuroscience. She worked under Dr. Victoria Luine, examining the neural effects of exposure to the environmental chemical Bisphenaiol A during development. Dr. Alexander-Street recently published in Neuroscience and has two other papers ready for submission. She comes to the Biological Sciences Department with much experience in instruction and a strong research background and will coordinate its Anatomy and Physiology Program.

James Lee

James Lee
College Lab Technician, Biological Sciences
B.S., University of California at Riverside; M.P.M., Simon Fraser University

James Lee is the greenhouse manager and a senior College Lab Technician in the Department of Biological Sciences. He received his B.S. in plant science from the University of California at Riverside and his M.P.M. from Simon Fraser University and worked as a research assistant at both institutions before beginning his career in horticulture. He has published several articles in Branching Out, An Integrated Pest Management Newsletter for Trees and Shrubs. Most recently, he worked in the Horticultural Department at Cornell University Cooperative Extension.

Gustavo Lopez

Gustavo Lopez
Professor, Chemistry
B.S., University of Puerto Rico at Humacao; Ph.D., University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Dr. Gustavo Lopez Quinones received his Ph.D. in physical chemistry from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst in 1991 and was a postdoctoral associate at the University of Rhode Island from 1991-92. He has produced numerous peer-reviewed publications and very significant external funding from various sources, including NSF, NASA, and NIH. His research interests lie in physical models for atomic and molecular nanostructured materials, confined fluids, proton wires, and polymeric materials in condensed phase.

Timothy Paget

Timothy Paget
Professor, Chemistry
Ph.D., University College, Cardiff

Dr. Timothy A. Paget, professor and chair of the Department of Chemistry, received a Ph.D. in parasite biochemistry from University College, Cardiff, Wales in 1986. He was a Wellcome postdoctoral research fellow in the Department of Microbiology at University College, Cardiff from 1986-89. Most recently, he was a Reader in Microbiology at the Medway School of Pharmacy, University of Kent, United Kingdom. His research interests include the biochemistry of protozoan parasites using leishmania and giardia as models and the discovery of novel anti-infective compounds from marine invertebrates. Dr. Paget has written numerous peer-reviewed publications and received significant external funding from the Royal Society NERC, Wellcome Trust, Leverhume Trust, and the Australian Research Council.

Thomas Young

Thomas Young
Assistant Professor, Chemistry
B.A., University of California at Santa Cruz; M.S., Ph.D., Stanford University

Dr. Thomas Young's research group uses statistical mechanics and computer simulations to study the solvation of complex biological surfaces in order to better understand the role of solvation in important biochemical processes. In particular, his group studies systems that can shed light on the physical principles that govern the recognition of small molecule ligands with proteins. A fundamental aim of his research is to develop computational methodologies that aid in the discovery and design of new drugs.

Stefan Becker

Stefan Becker
Professor, Environmental, Geographic, and Geological Sciences
D.N.S., Justus-Liebig-University, Giessen

Dr. Stefan Becker, professor and chair of the Department of Environmental, Geographic, and Geological Sciences, received a doctorate (Dr.rer.nat.) in 1994 from Justus-Liebig-University Giessen, Germany and completed his postdoctoral work at the University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. He previously was chair of the Department of Geography and Urban Planning at the University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh. He has written numerous peer-reviewed publications and has a significant external funding history. His research interests include physical geography, study of climatic processes and changes, and their uses and impact on cultures and ecosystems.

Danna Ethan

Danna Ethan
Assistant Professor, Health Sciences
B.A., Franklin and Marshall College; M.S.W., New York University; M.A., Ed.D., Columbia University

Dr. Danna Ethan joined Lehman this fall in the Department of Health Sciences as an assistant professor of health education. She earned her doctorate from Teachers College, Columbia University in 2008 with a grant-funded dissertation on improving the vision of urban children. As assistant professor for the past six years in the Health Education Department at the Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC), Dr. Ethan taught various health promotion courses, including stress management, and was chairperson of her department's curriculum and assessment committees, as well as an Honors Program mentor. She directed several college-wide health and wellness events and edited and contributed to her department's publication, HealthNotes. Dr. Ethan's primary research interest is college health promotion. Her current grant-funded projects involve focus groups with professors on their role in handling students in distress and the administration of the National College Health Assessment at BMCC.

Andrew Maroko

Andrew Maroko
Assistant Professor, Health Sciences
B.A., Rutgers University; M.Phil. and Ph.D., The Graduate Center, CUNY

Dr. Andrew Maroko's research interest is in health geographics and centers on the spatial analysis of environmental health and equity issues. His undergraduate degree was in biology, and his doctorate was earned in earth and environmental sciences, with a specialty in geography/GISc. He now teaches in the Department of Health Sciences in the M.P.H. Program, which is a member of the CUNY School of Public Health. Dr. Maroko is also the associate director of the Urban GISc Lab at Lehman. His publications include work on environmental justice, exposure assessment, pollution modeling, geo-statistical analyses, computational geography, urban health geographics, accessibility, and geovisualization.

Alsacia Pacsi

Alsacia Pacsi
Assistant Professor, Nursing
B.S., Long Island University; M.S., College of Mount Saint Vincent; D.N.S., The Graduate Center, CUNY

Dr. Alsacia Pacsi, D.N.S., F.N.P., R.N., is the first graduate of the CUNY Graduate Center doctoral program in nursing. Dr. Pacsi is a graduate of Long Island University, where she earned her B.S. in Nursing, and received her M.S. from the College of Mount St. Vincent. She is a family nurse practitioner and an expert who is certified in emergency room care and critical care. Her area of research is on the lived experience of second-generation Dominican women with breast cancer.

Scott Saccomano

Scott Saccomano
Assistant Professor, Nursing
B.A., Adelphi University; B.S., The City College of New York; M.S., Hunter College; Ph.D., Seton Hall University

Dr. Scott Saccomano, Ph.D., G.N.P., R.N., is a board-certified geriatric nurse practitioner and an expert in the care of the older adult and long-term care services. His research has centered on leadership, the use of assistive nursing personnel, and long-term care management.

Alfonso Gonzales

Alfonso Gonzales
Assistant Professor, Political Science
B.A., University of California at Los Angeles; M.A., Stanford University; M.A., Ph.D., University of California at Los Angeles

Dr. Alfonso Gonzales comes to Lehman after completing postdoctoral work at New York University. He holds a Ph.D. from the Department of Political Science at the University of California, Los Angeles (2008) and an M.A. in Latin American Studies from Stanford University (2002). Dr. Gonzales's scholarly interests focus on Latino and Latin American politics, migration control, deportation, human rights, transnational gangs, and migrant social movements in the U.S., Mexico, and Central America. He has published in the International Journal of Latino Studies, the North American Congress on Latin America-Report on the Americas, and with the Institute for Policy Studies in Washington, D.C. His research has been used in Federal immigration proceedings on behalf of Mexican and Central American asylum seekers.

Chiseche Mibenge

Chiseche Mibenge
Assistant Professor, Political Science
L.L.B., University of Zambia; Ph.D., Utrecht University

Before joining CUNY, Dr. Chiseche Mibenge worked as a researcher with the Netherlands Institute of Human Rights Research, a part of Utrecht University's School of Law. She focused her research on gender, violence, and access to justice in post-conflict societies and conducted field research in Rwanda and Sierra Leone. She has been invited as an international visiting scholar by American University's Washington College of Law's Center for Human Rights and Humanitarian Law, the University of Bradford's Department of Peacekeeping, and the National University for Rwanda's Center for Conflict Management. She also was a human rights expert on field missions with the UN and other international organizations in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Rwanda, and Sierra Leone, focusing on sexual violence and access to justice projects. Dr. Mibenge graduated from the University of Zambia's Law School and was admitted to the Bar as an Advocate of the High Court of Zambia. She obtained a master's degree in law, with a specialization in international and European protection of human rights, at Utrecht University's School of Law, and her final thesis examined the role of the international community in establishing genocide trials in post-conflict Rwanda. Dr. Mibenge will teach courses on politics and culture, human rights, and international law at Lehman. Her current research includes a critique of the narrow framing of masculinity as invariably violent/militarized by international development organizations that are supporting violence against women programs in developing countries.

Yvonne Johnson

Yvonne Johnson
Assistant Professor, Social Work
M.A., Aberdeen University; Ph.D., Columbia University

Dr. Yvonne Johnson received her Ph.D. in social work from Columbia University and her M.Sc. in social policy and social work studies from the London School of Economics. She comes to Lehman's Social Work Department after twelve years of teaching at the Rutgers University School of Social Work. Dr. Johnson also has had extensive experience working as a medical and psychiatric social worker, both in London and in New York City. Her publications have been focused on professional and ethical issues and on cultural competence, and have appeared in numerous professional journals, including Journal on Social Work Education, Journal of Social Work Education, Ethics and Social Welfare, Social Work, Research on Social Work Practice, and Social Service Review. She is teaching in both the undergraduate and graduate social work programs.

Mañuel Munoz

Mañuel Munoz
Lecturer, Social Work
B.A., Fordham University; M.S.W., Hunter College, CUNY

Mañuel Munoz received his M.S.W. degree from the Hunter College School of Social Work. For the past ten years, he has been on the faculty of the Ackerman Institute for the Family, where he was also a Senior Consultant. He has also taught at the Hunter College School of Social Work and has extensive practice, supervisory, and administrative experience, including twelve years with the Children's Aid Society. There he held various titles, including assistant director, director of Community Schools, director of East Harlem Counseling Center, and director of Training and Clinical Services. He is teaching in both the undergraduate and graduate social work programs.

Devrim Yavuz

Devrim Yavuz
Lecturer, Sociology
B.S., Middle East Technical University; M.A., Ph.D., McGill University

Dr. Devrim Yavuz is a political sociologist whose work explores the link between capitalism and democracy. He obtained his Ph.D. in Sociology from McGill University in 2006 with a dissertation entitled 'Business as Usual? Turkish Industrialists, the State and Democratization' in which he underlined the conditions necessary for the emergence of a pro-democracy economic elite in late-industrializing nations. There he taught courses in the areas of economic and industrial sociology as well as development. From 2006 to 2008 Devrim Yavuz worked as the Coordinator of the Quebec Inter-University Center for Social Statistics McGill-Concordia, an interdisciplinary center seeking to promote the use of social statistics to deal with policy relevant issues such as the determinants of income inequality. As an Associate Scholar with the French Institut Français d'Etudes Anatoliennes (Istanbul) and a Visiting Scholar at the Middle East and Middle Eastern American Center, the Graduate Center (CUNY), Devrim Yavuz built on his earlier research by examining whether business in newly industrialized countries will continue to remain favorable to democratic institutions in the face of the current economic climate and recent political conjunctures. Dr. Yavuz joins the Sociology faculty as a lecturer; initially he will be teaching courses in research methods and in political sociology.

LEONARD LIEF LIBRARY

Rebecca Arzola

Rebecca Arzola
Assistant Professor, Library
B.A., M.S.Ed., Lehman College; M.S., Pratt Institute

Professor Rebecca Arzola has been appointed Government Documents-Collection Development Librarian, overseeing the Library's Federal Depository collection, and she also is coordinating the College's popular Reading and Discussion Series. A Bronx native and Lehman alumna, she earned her B.A. in Speech Pathology and Audiology and her M.S.Ed. in Special Education. She received her M.L.S. and Advanced Certificate in Archives from Pratt Institute and previously worked for Monroe College and the New York Public Library.

Stefanie Havelka

Stefanie Havelka
Assistant Professor, Library
B.S., Information Management, University of Applied Sciences, Stuttgart; M.C.I.S., Communication and Information Studies, Rutgers University; M.S., Library and Information Science, Syracuse University; Advanced Certificate, Digital Libraries, Syracuse University

Professor Stefanie Havelka is the College's Electronic Resources-Web Services Librarian. She earned a B.S. in Information Management from Stuttgart's University of Applied Sciences. She has a Masters in Communication and Information Studies from Rutgers University; and her education was supplemented by two master's degrees in Information Studies, one from Syracuse and the other from Rutgers University. Professor Havelka offers a broad and varied background in corporate special libraries, including ABC News and the Monteverde Institute, Costa Rica. At the Goethe Institute, N.Y., she was Information Technology Manager where she launched a well-received redesign of the Library's website as a substitute in the position last year.